About MSHA


MSHA History

History reveals that we are the past, the sum of all the events that brought us to this day. It serves as a means to better understand who we are and how we got this way while providing a motivating guide for the future. Therefore, MSHA is truly indebted to the dedication, foresight, and accomplishments of its early leaders who have laid the foundation for MSHA as it is today. Their significant contributions to MSHA and the speech-language and audiology profession will not be forgotten. They now share historical accounts of the speech-language and audiology profession in MS during MSHA's early years. The torch will continue to be passed as new generations of MSHA professionals blaze a path of further achievements.

To our MSHA history contributors, THANKS FOR THE MEMORIES...

Mississippi Speech-Language-Hearing Association Records, Accretion
MSHA Records covering available documented MSHA activity from approximately 1960 to the present have been archived at the MS Archives and History Museum in Jackson, MS in September 2015 and May 2016. Additional MSHA submissions may be accepted at the museum throughout the future of the association. The current MSHA Records include photocopies of founding documents; minutes of officers' meetings; programs of conferences, meetings and conventions; lists of members and officers; and newsletters and journals of the organization. There are files on the presidents' activities and histories of the MSHA as well as letters and copies of legislation regarding the association's success in obtaining licensure of speech pathologists and audiologists. Please click the MS Archives and History Museum link for further information,

“This is a random walk through my memory mostly about audiology in Mississippi from 1967. The first two audiologists to hold a license in Mississippi were Margaret Wylde and myself. Unfortunately, those were hearing dispensing licenses, since this license predated the audiology and speech licenses by several years. It should be noted that dispensing by audiologists at that time was not considered ethical by ASHA. There was no requirement for medical supervision of dispensing. Audiologists were conducting ENG procedures prior to 1987. My PhD in 1977 was on electronstymography, and I was performing them in my private office at that time.

The MSHA Convention has been held on the coast twice, then at Oxford, Hattiesburg, Columbus, and Delta State. The one at Delta State was one day and with about 48 attendees in the early 70's.

The next year on the coast MSHA had approximately 300 attendees, the first wine social, the president of ASHA, and Chuck Berlin as paid speaker.”

Dr. Gordon Stanfield, Ph.D, CCC-A


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